Tag Archives: fun

4 Ways to Gamify Your Goals

4 ways leaders can gamify their goals

Gamify. It’s the new buzzword in online circles. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s basically adapting game design elements and principles into something that isn’t necessarily game related. Do we need to be that entertained? Even normal tasks must be gamified? ūüôā

If you’re anything like me, some goals can seem overly daunting. Others can be simply mundane. Using gamification can help break those daunting objectives into something more manageable and turn those everyday tasks into something a bit more fun.

We tend to pursue what we enjoy, right? For some, the act of setting and maintaining/pursuing goals can be fun in and of iteslef. For others, it can seem overly difficult. So, I thought I’d try to offer some ways that you could make the process more fun.

SET UP YOUR SYSTEM

  • View your goal-achieving as a game.¬†I tend to take things too seriously. Although I love to have fun, there’s some things that can really stress me out. Goals should not be one of those. They should be things we enjoy doing and achieving. Yes, they will be challenging, but we should like the ones we attempt to complete. Think about setting up your future plans as a game. Games typically have a way to accumulate points, levels when you get to certain objectives, and prizes you achieve as you win.
  • Create a point system for your goals.¬†Think about the kind and amount of points you want to assign to each goal. Short-term goals would receive fewer points. Long-term or bigger goals would receive more points. Once you hit a certain number, then you stop and celebrate (see below.)
  • Leveling up. As you achieve certain goals, you make the game harder. Each time you accumulate a set amount of points, you get to level up. When you improve and level up, the “prizes” get bigger and the levels get more challenging (more points required to Level Up.) Here’s an idea for how to establish the levels and points:
    • Level 1 (0 – 99 points) – Goal Starter
    • Level 2 (1000 – 1199 pts.) – Goal Getter
    • Level 3 (1200 – 1499 pts.) – Goal Commander
    • Level 4 (1500 – 1999 pts.) – Goal Master
    • Daily tasks = 1-2 points
    • 2-week goals = 10 points on¬†completion
    • 30 day goals = 25 points on completion
    • 90-day goals = 100 points on completion

SPECIFY THE STAKES

  • Raise the bar.¬†There’s no fun in achieving something easy or within your comfort zone. Where’s the fun in that? Make sure you set goals that are risky and outside your comfort zone.You might need to rethink how you set your goals.
  • Decide what you will risk. I’m not talking about gambling here, but how can you make your goals riskier? How will you push yourself outside of your comfort zone to achieve something that is difficult?
  • Determine what the rewards will be. The greater the risk and challenge, the greater the reward needs to be. It doesn’t have to be a monetary reward, but it can be. Reward yourself with extra time with your wife or kids, for example. Or reward yourself with a personal day to do something you enjoy. Decide what you will earn for each level. The more you Level Up, the more the reward should be.

CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS

This is something that many people forget when setting goals. You need to celebrate your wins – big and small. Some people may celebrate their big successes, but the small milestones are just as important.

  • Map out WHEN you’ll celebrate. At what point of achievement will you celebrate? Again, you could set a certain level of points where you’ll celebrate once you hit it. Or, you could celebrate at the completion of each goal. Be careful that you don’t wait too long or make these celebration points too difficult to achieve. Plus, you can always adjust your system as you go if necessary.
  • Line up HOW you’ll celebrate.¬†Before you start your goals, I would determine how you will celebrate the completion of each “level” or points, whatever you’ve already decided. Then, stick to it. It’s easy to blow past your milestones and postpone the celebration. But, it’s important for your morale to take time and acknowledge what you’ve accomplished. Again, it doesn’t have to cost money, and it doesn’t have to be something grand. The importance is that you take time to recognize your¬†wins.

SELECT YOUR SUPPORT CREW

Alright, this is where it could really get fun and motivating, especially if you have a team. If not, encourage your friends to join in the fun.

  • Challenge each other. Gamifying your goals can be fun on your own, but what if you got a few friends involved? Your goals don’t have to be the same, and you don’t even have to have the same system. The point is to encourage each other and help each other achieve more.
  • Keep each other accountable. There’s a lot of accountability in telling someone else what you want to accomplish. Form a Facebook Group for your team to stay connected. You and others can post when goals have been achieved, and you can encourage and support each other when the going gets tough.
  • Celebrate wins together.¬†Whether you do this as an online group or in person, make sure to recognize people when they hit their goals. Sometimes it’s easier to celebrate someone else’s achievements than our own. It’s also motivating when we see others accomplishing their goals. We can get¬†an extra push of motivation.

However you decide to set goals for the new year, be sure that they are goals that you really want to achieve and line up with your vision for your life’s direction. Life is too short to pursue things that don’t really matter. Take some time before the beginning of next year and work on your goals – whether you choose to gamify them or not.

How will you make your goals more engaging and fun this next year? If you choose to gamify your goals – let me know. I’d love to see what you create.¬†

Three Secrets of a Super-Fun Team

secrets to a super fun team

Have you ever wondered what makes some teams great and some, well, duds? So have I. I’ve been on teams that work really well together and are downright¬†a blast to be a part of. I’ve been on others where I couldn’t wait to go home at the end of the day. For many people, it may be a mixture of both fun and frustrating.

In working with a number of different teams, I’ve noticed a common thread among the ones who work really well together. There are certain characteristics that make these teams click. Lack of any of them, however, can cause any number of team dysfunctions.

Super-fun teams are good at collaboration

Fun teams work well together and have an atmosphere of trust and cooperation. If you’ve ever experienced working with people you don’t¬†trust, you know how stifling¬†that can be. And, it just takes one person to ruin an environment of trust.

You would think trust takes a lot of time to develop. The fact is, trust can be developed very quickly and that foundation can continue to be built upon. According to Stephen Covey, there are 13 behaviors you can us to develop what he calls “the speed of trust.”

Collaboration is a by-product of a high-trust environment. You can see this in those with whom you work. You tend to work well with those you trust and avoid those you don’t. The partnerships you seek are with people you know you can trust – for obvious reasons.

As you look at your team – how would you rate your level of collaboration?

Super-fun teams exhibit effective communication

Teams and co-workers communicate all the time. But is it effective? Have you moved forward with a project, only to find out at the end, that you weren’t given all the critical details?

When your team communicates effectively, it will increase productivity and significantly effect your bottom line, as well as overall team morale. People will feel more engaged and a critical part of the process.

What is the level of effective communication within your team?

Super-fun teams know when it’s time for celebration

I’m a part of a team that loves to celebrate. Whether it’s someone’s birthday, or a new team member comes on board or leaves, we celebrate. (And, no, we’re not celebrating the fact they’re leaving but going on to new adventures!)

The celebration usually centers around food, as well as the person we are celebrating. There is eating, laughing, conversation, eating, more laughing, sometimes singing, maybe a game or two (but not always), eating, frivolity, and did I mention eating? ūüôā Usually there is a theme, and it’s based on something that the person we’re celebrating likes.

We do our best to not talk about work (for the most part we are very successful). It’s not time to check in on business, but it is time for a party. We have lots of fun and don’t worry about work.

So, you may know these things already. The question then becomes, how do we make the above a reality? One of the best ways I know of to increase all of these is through a combination of icebreakers and team building activities.

That’s why I wrote a brand new book of these kind of exercises called, 10 Super Fun Team Icebreakers and Challenges. In it, you’ll find 10 team building activities that have never been printed anywhere else.

super fun team ebook

These are activities that I’ve spent the last few months creating and designing for teams just like yours. Whether you need better collaboration, communication, or you just want a day of celebration, these exercises will help your team, all based on the superhero theme.

You can use these activities one at a time, or you can group them together for a Super-Fun team adventure. Or do a half-day event by picking and choosing a few of the challenges. You decide.

Here’s¬†a sneak peek at the book.

Right now, you can order the book for only $10.¬†It not only includes the activities, but also has suggestions for how to use the book, instructions for how to facilitate each activity, and also (my personal favorite) a “Deep Dive” section where you can take the activity further and dig into the challenges even more.

If you end up buying the book and do some of the activities, please let me know. I’d love to know how it goes – send pictures, email me with how it went – who knows, maybe you and your team will even be featured on the blog or my social media accounts (with your permission, of course!)

Leadership Lessons I Learned from My Daughter, the Junior Philanthropist

Leadership lessons I learned from my daughter

It’s a lot of fun to watch children grow up as a parent, especially when they start to come into their own as a person. I have two kids and both are pretty amazing in their own ways. My 9-year old son loves sports and works hard at each of them and is very naturally¬†gifted in the athletic arena.

My daughter continues to amaze me with both her thoughtfulness and unselfishness and her willingness to sacrifice for others. I wish I could tell you I taught her that, or it was an intentional outcome of great parenting. However, she has exhibited this characteristic since she was very young.

I remember her making cards for her friends that were sick when she was in Kindergarten and first grade. She made a sympathy card for one of her teachers when she was in the 4th grade that showed an enormous amount of compassion and empathy.

What’s impressed me most, though, is her willingness to raise money for a specific group of kids in Haiti. My wife has visited an orphanage in Haiti over the last few years – Hands Across The Sea. It is an integral part of her year, and my daughter has involved herself in a number of ways, even though she hasn’t been able to go (yet).

Molly decided a couple of years ago that she wanted to help one of the students¬†pay for school. The amount she needed to raise? Two hundred seventy five dollars. That’s a decent amount for anyone to fund-raise, but for a 9-year old? I didn’t want to discourage her, but I had my doubts. Yet¬†I also knew my daughter and, once she decides to do something, she’s almost impossible to stop.

After a year of lemonade stands, selling rainbow loom bracelets, collecting change, dog-walking and more, she did it. She saved up for a whole year and not once did I see her get down or discouraged. She accomplished her goal chunk by chunk, bit by bit.

You should have seen her face when we counted the money and she was only $10 shy of reaching her goal. She was overjoyed! And, being the good dad that I am ;), I committed the final $10 to the cause.

Just this weekend, she made cake pops for her teachers for Valentine’s Day. She had help from a couple of friends, but she did the majority of the work herself. (And they’re a lot of work!) They were pretty amazing too! (Just ask our neighbor who recently ate 9 in one sitting.)

And she’s back at it for the kids in Haiti. Last night, she went to Hobby Lobby with my wife and used $25 of her own money to buy them art supplies, toys, and fun crafts to do. She loves it. And she can’t wait until the day that she can go with my wife to meet these kids in person. And they will love her!

To say I’m proud of my daughter is an understatement. But it’s not about what she does or is doing.

It’s about Who. She. Is.

She’s making a difference one life at a time. And here’s what I’ve learned and continue to learn from my baby girl.

Do What’s On Your Heart

Whether it’s big or small, act on your intuition. Help when you can and where you can. Don’t worry about the what or when or why. As you seek to do what’s on your heart, doors will open and you might be pretty amazed at the result.

Give What You Can, When You Can

Again, it doesn’t have to be a huge sum¬†of money. It might just be a little bit of your time or a smile that can make a difference in someone’s day. Write a note to or text a friend and let them know you’re thinking about them. Send a card with a handwritten note. Or cake pops. You could make some cake pops. ūüôā

Think Outside of Yourself

This is so hard sometimes. The older I get, the harder it seems. When you have work,¬†sports, music lessons, and more, life can get in the way. It’s easy to get lost in the busy-ness of life. But it’s important to remember and to think about how we can love and serve others. For Molly, it’s easy because that’s just who she is. For you and me, it might take a little more effort.

Persistence is Key

Chunk by chunk. Bit by bit. Stay on that goal until you achieve it. Does it matter if you don’t get it done by the time YOU want it accomplished? Don’t give up – keep after it – even if it takes much longer than expected. Think about how incredible it will be when you’ve achieved it.

Invite Others to Share in the Journey

My daughter is a very social creature. She loves being around friends and including them in her projects. What a great lesson to learn. Isn’t life more fun when we share the journey with others? Oftentimes, we start to wonder what people will think if we tell them about an idea or something we want to do. Ask other people to be involved – let them decide whether they want to or not (and don’t get discouraged if they say, “no”.)

Those are just a few of the lessons I learn from this crazy cool kid. I love watching her grow up and can’t wait to see what the Lord is going to do with her in the future. Whatever it is, though, I know one thing. She will embody all the things I’ve listed above and more. Because that’s who she was created to be.

One more thing. Her birthday is coming up next month. Guess what she wants to do for her “party”? Go take some friends to feed the homeless at a local shelter. Yup. She’s THAT kid. And I love it.

What leadership lessons have you learned from your kids? What is one way you can implement the lessons above? Let me know in the comments below. 

Five More Funny Teamwork Videos to Get Your Team Talking

more funny teamwork videos

In my last post on Funny Teamwork Videos, I found a few videos that might lighten up a team meeting or be good examples of what NOT to do as team members along with a few debriefing questions after each one.

Here are a few more funny videos that I’ve found since then. The first three¬†are from the same duo, Tripp and Tyler, out of Georgia. You might need special permission to use some of these videos in any team meetings, so do your research before using these. (These guys are seriously funny, and I wouldn’t normally use three videos from the same people, but they are great!)

1. A Conference Call in Real Life

Has your team ever hosted a webinar or conference call? See if you can relate to this video, and answer some questions afterward.

Team process questions:

1.) Who do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

2. Every Meeting Ever

You know that guy? In that meeting? Yes, that’s the one I’m talking about. Which of these personality styles are you in a meeting?

Team debrief questions:

1.) Who do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

4.) What ways can our meetings be improved?

5.) How can different personalities work together to improve meeting times?

3. Email in Real Life

Like or not, email is a part of every day work life. It doesn’t have to be painful, and it can be very productive. Look for issues that you can relate to and figure out how those issues could be addressed productively.

Team process questions:

1.) What do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

4.) How can we improve our email processes?

4. American Airlines Team Building Spoof

Every had one of those way-uncomfortable team building experiences where it seems like only the facilitator is having a good time? (Maybe at your expense?) Here’s a fun video to get you to think about the team building experience.

Debrief Questions:

1.) Share a funny team building story.

2.) What can you relate to in this video?

3.) How can we improve our team building experiences to make them more enjoyable and more effective?

5. Problem Solving with The Big Bang Theory

Where does your team hit roadblocks when you try to come up with solutions? Is it the same obstacle every time? Or are there multiple roadblocks? What alternative solutions can you come up with to help solve these dilemmas?

1.) What issues can we relate with on this video?

2.) What challenges do we have as a team when collaborating?

3.) How can we improve collaboration and make everyone feel a part?

 

Hope you enjoyed these videos as much as I enjoyed compiling them for you. I would love to hear how you used them with your team and what solutions you came up with to improved certain processes.

What was your favorite video and why? Which one will you use for a teachable moment with your team? Let me know in the comments below.

7 Team Building Games You Can Lead with Hula Hoops

games with hula hoops

If I say, “Hula Hoop,” what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Quick!

When you think of hula hoops, you probably don’t necessarily think of team building games. You might think of memories of elementary school PE or recess. You might think of a sibling or neighbor who used to enjoy playing with them.

As for me, a number of team activities come to mind! (Surprise, surprise.) Most of these I have experienced and led; however, some of them are new to me and a couple are adapted from other exercises that I have led.

Here are some fun and challenging team building games you can do with hula hoops. Some only require one hoop per group, but some of them require several. Make sure you’ll know how many you need before you start each activity and, as always, let me know how it goes!

7 Team Building Activities with Hula Hoops

1. Hula Hut Relay

With this activity, teams are challenged to first build a hut made from 6 hula hoops, and then they must get their hole team to pass through the hut, one at a time, until everyone has made it through.

Variations: Once team members have successfully completed the first challenge, then there are several other ways to play this game:

a. Have each person go through backwards.

b. Each team member must pass through blindfolded.

c. Once a hole or gap is used, it may not be used again.

Watch this video to see an example:

2. All Aboard

In this challenge, a team is asked to get everyone inside the hula hoop with no hand or feet touching outside the circle. Use varying sizes of hula hoops to adjust to your group size or to make it more challenging.

3. Hula Hut Tower

Similar to the hula hut challenge, the teams make a hula hut but see how high they can stack them. No one has to go through the huts, however. Tallest tower wins bragging rights.

4. Hula Pass Through

Have your group stand in a circle holding hands. This challenge is for the team to pass the hula hoop once around the circle without anyone letting go. Once the team is successful with that, have them pass two different-sized hoops around the circle in opposite directions.

Variations:

a. Add a deflated tire tube to the mix to up the difficulty.

b. Add a ball under the chin (no hand allowed) to the exercise to increase the difficulty even more!

5. Hula Crossing

Similar to a river crossing or junk yard-type challenge, you can use different-sized hula hoops to set up an exercise to move a team from one point to another. To increase the difficulty, use smaller (and fewer) hoops.

Here’s a video of a similar challenge, Hot Chocolate River Crossing:

 

6. Helium Hoop

This is a variation on the helium stick exercise. The object of this exercise is to lower the hula hoop to the ground. Sounds easy, right? This is a lot harder than it looks, and it is because of the rules.

Rule #1 РYou may only use your forefingers to touch the hoop.

Rule #2 – Everyone’s fingers (both of them) must be touching the hoop at all times.

It really is a fun and amazingly hard challenge! It pushes the teams to communicate and really focus on working together.

7. Hula Crossing + All Aboard

This last one is a combination of two previous challenges. Combine them to make one extreme challenge. A group starts in one spot and must cross over to the last hoop, where everyone must get on the “island” or perish.

Push your group to use only smaller-sized hoops for both the “crossing” piece of the challenge, and the All Aboard at the end.

Make It Fun and Challenging

There are 2 great reasons to do team building activities of any kind. One is to have an enjoyable experience. The other is to move your team out of their comfort zone and learn something about themselves that can transform both individuals and groups.

The great thing about these challenges is that they are both fun and challenging. You don’t have to sacrifice one for the other. There may be times when you emphasize one over the other, but with these hula hoop activities, you have both enjoyment and difficulty.

Don’t Forget to Debrief

After you finish with each activity, take some time to process through each experience. You can use other activities to debrief, you can use one of many creative debrief exercises, or you can create your own using the hula hoops.

Whatever you decide to do, take your time in processing the activities. Don’t skimp out here. Many of the team’s “aha” moments will happen here, and you can also move a team into other activities based on what is revealed during the debrief process.

 

5 Quick and Easy Icebreaker Games You Can Do with 1 Piece of Webbing

webbing for team building activities

Here are a few icebreaker games you can do with a short piece of 1″ Tubular Webbing. You’ll need one piece of webbing about 15 feet long for each of these activities. If you only have one group (up to 10 or 12 people), you can use the same piece of webbing for each one. If you will be facilitating these icebreaker games for more than one group at a time, then you will need one length of webbing per group.

You can find tubular webbing online, or at local outdoor stores, such as REI. It comes in several different colors, and you want to get webbing that is an inch wide.If you don’t have a local outdoor store near you, you might also find webbing at horse tack shops and/or military surplus stores.

Use these for individual exercises, or group them together for a unique team building experience. I would also recommend using some creative debriefing exercises following each activity if you’re doing more than one.

1. Webbing House

For this icebreaker activity, you will need your length of webbing, and you will also need to print out the following image on a piece of paper:

webbing icebreaker game

The object of this activity is to make the webbing look like the picture. There are 3 levels that a person can enter into (don’t let the participant know what “level” they’ve achieved until after completing it one time.)

Level 1 – The webbing crosses over itself in at least 1 place.

Level 2 – The webbing does not cross over itself at all, but the ends do not touch.

Level 3 – No webbing crosses over itself and the loose ends meet.

After an individual or team has attempted the activity once, let them know what level they entered at, and see if they can “level up” from there. At this point, you can let them know what it takes to get to the next level.

(*Facilitator’s note. I learned this activity from Mark Collard, formerly of Project Adventure. As far as he knows, no one has ever achieved Level 3; however, do not let participants know this. When you debrief with them, you can talk about adventure. Part of adventure is experimenting with¬†what is possible. Would you try something if you knew it wasn’t even possible?)

2. Where ya from/Where ya been?

This activity also uses a circular piece of webbing. The goal of this activity is for each person in the group to:

1.) Share where they are from or a place they have been to recently.

2.) Create a shape with the webbing that represents the place they have described and then share what about that place makes it important to them.

It’s a simple activity, but it’s a great way to get to know your group better. We all have significant places in our history – it’s part of our story. This game allows people to share that part of their story with others.

3. Twice around the block.

This fun icebreaker game helps people introduce themselves in a non-threatening way. You’ll need a piece of webbing for every 5-6 people. The webbing should be made into a circle using a¬†water knot.

The person closest to the knot goes first and lets go of the webbing. As she begins to introduce herself, the rest of the group starts sliding the webbing through their hands so that the knot moves around the circle.

Once the knot goes twice around the circle and ends up back at the person talking, that person’s turn is over, and it moves to the next individual.

If the story is interesting, people can slow the rotation down to hear more about the speaker. If they would like the person’s time to end, they can speed it up! Often, teams will speed up the knot passing, laugh, and then slow it down to let each person have ample time to speak.

4. That’s a Wrap!

Each person takes turn telling a story about themselves. The participant chooses the story and as they talk they begin to wrap the webbing around their index finger. The story ends when all of the webbing is wrapped around the finger.

The person who told the story must unwind the webbing by holding on to the loose outside end, and flinging it through their legs backward. Just don’t hit anyone in the process! ūüôā

5. Spectrums.

This is a great get-to-know-you activity where people answer questions based upon where they fall along a given spectrum. For instance: Cat lover or dog lover? Chocolate or vanilla? etc.

Make sure there are no knots or kinks in the webbing and lay the piece of webbing along the ground in a straight line. Also, be sure there is ample room on either end of the webbing, in case more space is needed.

You will ask the group certain questions, and each person will need to position himself or herself along the line according to how they answer each question.

For each spectrum chosen, let your group know which end corresponds to what answer. Participants can line up anywhere along the spectrum. For example, if you say one end represents “Chocolate” and one end represents “Vanilla”, people can choose one end or the other, or anywhere in between.

Ask for some people to share why they chose that specific place along the spectrum. Be creative, and use as many questions as you want. What ways would you like to get to know your team?

What other ways can you use webbing for an icebreaker game? Let me know in the comments below!

Disclosure:  Some of the links above are affiliate links, and if you decide to make a purchase I will earn a commission at no additional cost to you.  Please know that I have experience with all of these companies, and I recommend them not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something but because they are helpful and useful, .  Please only spend money on these products if you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your or your team’s goals.

[caption photo courtesy DaveOlsen, Flickr]

 

A Team Building Activity Adapted from The Biggest Loser

Team Building idea Chinese lanters

I’m always looking for new ideas for team building activities. Last night, I was watching The Biggest Loser with my family. We find the show very uplifting¬†and encouraging. One of the activities they did inspired an idea for a team building activity that I want to share with you.

The participants had been on a hike together, and at the peak of their hike, the trainers gave them what looked like a small, folded piece of paper. However, inside of the paper was a butterfly. They were to answer the question, “What is your intention for the remainder of your time here?”

After everyone had shared, they opened up their folder paper, and released a butterfly, symbolizing both their journey of transformation and what their part was going to be in that process until the end.

Ways to Use This Team Building Activity

There are several scenarios where you could use this kind of activity:

  1. Launching a new project and using this with project managers or team  leaders.
  2. In the middle of a project that is heading in the wrong direction. Use it to help re-direct both staff and leaders.
  3. At the end of a project to celebrate accomplishments and talk about what’s next on the horizon.
  4. Taking your team to a new level of trust and authenticity.

How to Set Up This Team Activity

Set up for this activity will be relatively easy. I don’t think you necessarily need to have butterflies folded up in paper pouches; although, if you could pull that off, it would be impressive. (If you live near a Butterfly Pavilion, Nature Center or Botanical Gardens, it might be worth a call to see what’s possible.)

Decide what end result you want to achieve. I talk a lot about setting goals and being intentional about team building activities. To get the most out of them, you have to think about what results you want to achieve. Learn more here.

Begin with a hike or some kind of team activity that isn’t competitive and will focus on change and transformation. You can check out Playmeo for a great database¬†of activities.

At the end of the hike, ask the question (you will need to tweak the question depending on how you want to use the activity):

As we’re looking at this new project, what will be your primary intention you will focus on?

Allow ample time for responses. Encourage everyone to share (but we follow the rule of challenge by choice). After everyone has shared, release the butterflies (or other item – see below for modifications).

Debriefing the Activity

Talk about what people have shared and their commitment to the team and project and that part of the responsibility of the team is to hold each other accountable to our intentions and goals.

[You could also combine this activity with a time of goal-setting and looking at ways to hold the team accountable to goals and intentions.]

Ways to Modify This Activity

Knowing that everyone might not have access to butterflies, here are a few ways that this activity could be modified to use:

  1. Instead of butterflies, you could use helium-filled balloons and¬†release them at the proper time. Talk about ways for the groups intentions to stay on track and not become “deflated” (see what I did there.)
  2. You could do this activity at night and use Chinese lanterns. Light them and release them to symbolize the group’s intentions being shared with everyone.
  3. If you are talking about a project NOT going well, you could ask your team to write on pieces of paper things that are not working well, and at the end of the sharing time, you burn the pieces of paper, symbolizing you are letting go of old ways and then brainstorm of ways to get the project back on track.

How else you use an activity like this for your team? What other ways can you modify it to suit your needs?