Tag Archives: team morale

5 Leadership Lessons You Can Learn from a Micro-Manager

leadership lessons from a micro manager

When I was in my early twenties, within the space of about three weeks I lost my job, my grandmother passed away (her funeral was on my birthday, no less), my dog died, and I became fairly ill. It was like a country song gone bad.

During that season, I worked for a guy that was a micro-manager. I was in a job that stretched me, for sure. But I was willing to work on the things that I didn’t know, and I was committed to do whatever I needed to make things work with my boss.

No matter your situation there are leadership lessons that you can learn. Regardless of circumstances, there are always “take-away’s.” These are lessons you can learn if you give it a little thought and reflect on your experiences.

Here are five such lessons I learned from my experience working with a micro-manager:

Be willing to work on your differences

One of my takeaways from that experience is to always be willing to work on the things that make you different. Everyone has unique gifts and strengths to bring to the table.

What are your strengths? What are your boss’s strengths? What are your subordinate’s strengths? What differences are there? How can your differences complement one another?

If you sit down and go through these, chances are you’ll find that your strengths and even differences complement each other and, if you use them correctly, can really move your team from being so-so to being awesome!

Hire the right people for the right position.

Knowing about strengths and personality can also help on the front end. Before you ever hire someone, it would serve you well to perform a personality test and a strengths assessment. Using these two things can tell a boss or hiring manager up front if they are the right person for the position you’re hiring for (and, just as importantly, if they’re not).

There are a number of professionals that use the Stengthsfinder 2.0 assessment for hiring. Leadership guru and virtual mentor, Michael Hyatt, is one of them.

Give people the freedom to do their jobs.

Once you hire a person, you’ve just given that person your endorsement. If you feel a need to micro-manage, then the insecurity is really with yourself. So, back off and let the person do what you’ve hired them to do.

Give your new hire time to adjust to the new position, responsibilities, and culture. If you discover they need additional training for technical skills, then provide

If you discover that someone is not as proficient as they first seemed? You have at least two options:

  • Provide more training.
  • Let them go and rehire that position.

The issue with the second option is that it usually will cost you more to re-hire than to invest in some training.

Develop your people as needed.

Every company should have a training culture. The best companies know that it is easier and cheaper to train staff than to rehire for those positions.

Few people come into a new job or position knowing everything they need to know. Whether it’s a matter of training on company culture and process or learning new hard skills, there is a learning curve for every job. (Even for people that move within a company, different departments can even have their own unique culture within the overall company culture.)

Investing in training leads to more engagement and better retention of employees. Commit to a culture of training and development.

Work on Yourself as the Leader

There are a number of companies that have a great training culture…initially. Does your company continue to develop and encourage the development of its employees beyond the first few weeks or months?

Amazon’s training includes a 1-month initial training program as well as prepays 95% of employee’s tuition for in-demand fields.

Bonobos, a leading retail company, has multiple offerings to train their employees in leadership, management and customer service.

Randstad US not only offers programs in management, leadership, communication, and presentation skills, but also offers its employees both mentoring and coaching services.

As you may have gathered, my boss was not committed to working on things as I was, and I was let go. It was disappointing, but I definitely did learn a lot from that experience.

There are some things that both of us could have done to really make that situation better. I have learned to be a better communicator. The pastor I worked with could have committed to working on the relationship and helping me get better instead of asking me to leave immediately.

It may not have been the right position for me anyway; however, that’s why it’s so important to know more about people on the front end of hiring. I definitely believe that every company, every boss, and every hiring manager could benefit from doing their due diligence before they hire anyone. And every company can engage their employees by providing training to get them familiar with the company culture and continue to develop them as leaders and people.

What does your company do before hiring someone? What kind of on-going training do you provide? 

[photo credit: Nosnibor137 and Bigstock Photo.]

Five More Funny Teamwork Videos to Get Your Team Talking

more funny teamwork videos

In my last post on Funny Teamwork Videos, I found a few videos that might lighten up a team meeting or be good examples of what NOT to do as team members along with a few debriefing questions after each one.

Here are a few more funny videos that I’ve found since then. The first three are from the same duo, Tripp and Tyler, out of Georgia. You might need special permission to use some of these videos in any team meetings, so do your research before using these. (These guys are seriously funny, and I wouldn’t normally use three videos from the same people, but they are great!)

1. A Conference Call in Real Life

Has your team ever hosted a webinar or conference call? See if you can relate to this video, and answer some questions afterward.

Team process questions:

1.) Who do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

2. Every Meeting Ever

You know that guy? In that meeting? Yes, that’s the one I’m talking about. Which of these personality styles are you in a meeting?

Team debrief questions:

1.) Who do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

4.) What ways can our meetings be improved?

5.) How can different personalities work together to improve meeting times?

3. Email in Real Life

Like or not, email is a part of every day work life. It doesn’t have to be painful, and it can be very productive. Look for issues that you can relate to and figure out how those issues could be addressed productively.

Team process questions:

1.) What do I identify with in this video?

2.) What issues does this video address that we need to address?

3.) What are some solutions for the issues discovered?

4.) How can we improve our email processes?

4. American Airlines Team Building Spoof

Every had one of those way-uncomfortable team building experiences where it seems like only the facilitator is having a good time? (Maybe at your expense?) Here’s a fun video to get you to think about the team building experience.

Debrief Questions:

1.) Share a funny team building story.

2.) What can you relate to in this video?

3.) How can we improve our team building experiences to make them more enjoyable and more effective?

5. Problem Solving with The Big Bang Theory

Where does your team hit roadblocks when you try to come up with solutions? Is it the same obstacle every time? Or are there multiple roadblocks? What alternative solutions can you come up with to help solve these dilemmas?

1.) What issues can we relate with on this video?

2.) What challenges do we have as a team when collaborating?

3.) How can we improve collaboration and make everyone feel a part?

 

Hope you enjoyed these videos as much as I enjoyed compiling them for you. I would love to hear how you used them with your team and what solutions you came up with to improved certain processes.

What was your favorite video and why? Which one will you use for a teachable moment with your team? Let me know in the comments below.

7 Ways to Motivate Your Team Red-Carpet Style

team building red carpet event

There are a lot of ways to motivate your team and let them know you appreciate them. Since we are in the season of major award shows and nominations, I wanted to offer some suggestions on ways to help motivate and encourage your people “red-carpet style.”

Several of these can be done with a limited budget and many of these can be tweaked or combined to create an all-out superstar event that your people will talk about for years to come.

1. Roll out the red carpet

Make your employees feel like stars. Surprise them with a red carpet experience that they won’t soon forget. Rent a large red carpet and have your employees enter work in style. Encourage a “dress-up day” citing some important people arriving that day.

In addition to the red carpet,  have some volunteers who are clamoring to take their picture with these VIP’s. Who doesn’t like attention like that?

Variations:

Add a limo to have your team take pictures in before going in to work. Or, as they arrive, let them take a ride around the block in the limo and have some paparazzi (see below) waiting for them when they come back.

2. Give Your Team the Paparazzi Treatment

You can pair this with another event listed here, or do it on its own. Surprise your employees at work one morning with a line of paparazzi waiting for them to enter the building.

Imagine your team walking in with people shouting their name and taking massive amounts of pictures of them as they arrive, making them feel like Golden Globe or Oscar nominees.

3. Plan a Limo Lunch for Star Employees

Once a year or once a quarter (depending on your budget), take your star employees out for a nice lunch and transport them there via a limo.

How will you choose which ones go? Have a contest (sales, production, etc.) and set criteria to qualify. Everyone who qualifies gets to go.

Variation: Want to pair this with a way to increase customer service? Combine the qualification process with those who receive a certain number of compliments, customer service awards/points, or positive customer experience evaluations.

4. Host an Oscars Awards Night for Your Team

It’s time for some serious fun and some serious planning. Combine all of the above events to create an awards nights for your crew. This will take a lot of leg work and advanced planning, but what better way to honor your employees?

Hand out awards as part of the night. Be creative. Hand out serious awards, plus some fun ones. Get a team together to help brainstorm and plan the night.

5. After-party.

Plan an after-work party to thank your employees. Hire someone to cater food and drinks. Bring in a DJ for some after-work foot-stomping fun.

Variation: Go to an off-site venue, such as a lake house, hotel, or other hot spot in the area.

6. Create a “People’s Choice Awards” Event

Host an awards night where members of your team vote on different categories of awards to give out at a party dedicated to honoring the best and brightest among your crew.

Possible awards to hand out:

Best Salesman
Best Saleswoman
Best Support Staff
Best Advertising Campaign

Variations:

Have a crazy awards night – brainstorm some creative ideas on awards to give out and make it a fun, creative event.

“Most Likely to Sell Snow to a Snowman”

“Most Likely to Call in Sick After [favorite sports team] Loses”

“Best Excuse for Missing Work”

7. Premier Movie Event

Honor your employees by hosting a premier movie event. Announce that they will be experiencing a one-of-a-kind movie premier as a way of thanking them. What you don’t tell them is that they are the stars in this movie premier.

Hire a videographer to take some covert shots of your crew performing at their best. Have an editor compile it into a movie-premiere styled video and show it off at a local theater.

Variation: Combine this event with the After Party idea and/ or limo rides (above) to make it a special night that will “wow” your team.

What other ways can you think of to thank your people “red-carpet” style? Which one sounds most do-able for you?

[Photo credit: Zoonabar via Flickr.]